Ghevar: A Delight of Indian Cuisine

Photo Courtesy: idiva

Photo Courtesy: idiva

A Rajasthani sweet, Ghevar is traditionally linked with Teej Festival which comes during the monsoon season. Teej represents the union of Goddess Parvati & Lord Shiva. Besides Rajasthan, the dessert is very famous in nearby states of Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat, Harayana, Delhi, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh etc.

Ghevar is normally made in January for Makar Sankranti festival, in March-April for Gangaur festival and in July-August for the festival of Teej.

This dessert has its origins in the city of Jaipur, capital of Rajasthan. Flour, sugar and oil are mixed with ghee forming thick and tempting batter. The batter is fried into a cake and then cooled, served with almonds, pistachios or cardamom powder.

The Indian cooks use good amount of sugar, oil, flour, milk and ghee to make Ghevar during Teej. Ghevar easily available throughout India in the days close to Teej. This dessert is first fried in a pot, then it is taken out and left to cool. The cakes of Ghevar are put in levels with three different layers cooled, sugar dipped and put on top of each other to give you a delicious dish.

There are many types of Ghevar that include Plain Ghevar, Mewa Ghevar & Malai Ghevar. When a layered Ghevar is made, sometime people add custard cream at the top of each layer. Many people use cardamom powder, pistachios and almonds on the top of these layers when they are wet with sugar. Another recipe for this sweet is made by making a hole in the center and filling the hole with cream or figs.

If you want to know more about Indian sweets, you can go to: South Asian Sweets

Try some Ghevar recipes at home:-

  1. Recipe 1 : http://bit.ly/1LwtiA7
  2. Recipe 2 : http://bit.ly/1EfWYPP
  3. Ghevar With Rabri Recipe : http://bit.ly/1PvsxoR
  4. Ghevar With Kesar Rabri Recipe: http://bit.ly/1hXh8Uy
  5. Video: http://bit.ly/1Nxe3Y2

Dosa: A Staple Food of South India

Photo Courtesy: ndtv

Photo Courtesy: ndtv

Listed on the World’s 50 most Delicious Foods, Dosa is a fermented crepe. It is made of rice batter & black lentils. Dosa originated in South India and is a major food in Tamil Nadu, Karnataka, Telangana, Kerala & Andhra Pradesh. Although, it is a popular dish in other states of India too. It has also made its presence in other countries like Mauritius, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Myanmar, Singapore & Malaysia.

 

History of Dosa

Photo Courtesy: gosvalayurmed

Photo Courtesy: gosvalayurmed

Dosa represents South Indian food. Its exact place of origin is a matter of discussion. But, according to K.T. Achaya, a food historian, dosa has its origins in ancient Tamil country in 1st century AD. According to the researcher P. Thankappan Nair, dosa has its source in the Udipi town of Karnataka. It may also be due to the dish’s connection with Udupi restaurants that dosa’s origins are linked to Udipi.

The original dosa of Tamil was thicker and softer. The dosa which is popular nowadays is crispier and thinner and it was first made in Karnataka.

 

Variations of Dosa

Photo Courtesy: 8elementssd

Photo Courtesy: 8elementssd

There are many variations of Dosa. Some of them are listed below:-

Masala Dosa(click on the link to know more)
• Mini soya dosa
• Pesarattu
• Light white dosa
• Mysore Masala Dosa
• Onion Rava Dosa
• Ragi Wheat Dosa
Rava Dosa(click on the link to know more)
Benne Dosa(click on the link to know more)
Neer Dosa(click on the link to know more)

 

Nutritional Value

Dosa is a perfect breakfast dish and a street food. It is high in carbohydrates and has no saturated fats or sugar. As its ingredients include urad dal (Vigna mungo) and rice, it is also rich in protein. Due to the fermentation process involved in its preparation, it has increased content of Vitamin C and Vitamin B. Dosa should be avoided by diabetics as they have high glycemic index. They contain low calorie but high fat.

 

How to Serve?

Photo Courtesy: crosscountrexchange

Photo Courtesy: crosscountrexchange

To make it a complete meal, dosa is often stuffed with vegetables and sauces. Normally, there is a vegetarian side dish that is served with dosa. Common side dishes include:-

• Sambar
• Chutney(Most commonly: Coconut chutney)
• Dry Chutney
• Pickles

 

How to Prepare?

For a quick and easy recipe of some popular dosas click on one of the following links:-

Simple Dosa
Masala Dosa
Rava Dosa
Onion Rava Dosa
Neer Dosa
Pesarattu
Mini Soya Dosa
Mysore Masala Dosa

 

Dal-Bati-Churma: A Rajasthani Delight

Photo Courtesy: feminiya

Photo Courtesy: feminiya

Dal Bati Churma is a very popular Rajasthani dish that is a treat for your taste-buds. It’s a staple food in several parts of India including Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh. It is served in a traditional way by first squashing the Bati and then pouring the Ghee on it. Yellow colored daal (lentil) is also served with it. It is served in all the celebrations and festivals of Rajasthan including weddings, religious occasions or birthday parties.

Three different food items-Daal (lentils), Baati & Churma(Sweet) combine to give you “Daal-Baati-Churma”. Daal is typically made of lentils and is spicy. Baati is made of flour. The sweet Churma is a combination of wheat flour, dry fruits & sugar. Ghee is added in all the three items.

In villages, Baatis are baked on firewood or kandas(i.e. cow dung cakes). But when you are preparing in your kitchen you can use Tandoor or electric oven. Baatis are served dipped in Ghee. The daal is also prepared in Ghee, the masalas used in daal are fried in Ghee and before serving, more Ghee is added to the daal. Churma is sometimes made by crushing the Baatis and mixing it with sugar.

All in all, it is a treat for you and your guests, suitable for any occasion.

To know more about Dal Bati Churma visit>>Daal Baati Churma

Try the simple recipe at>>http://www.tastyfix.com/recipe/dal-baati-churma-trla