History of Authentic Mughlai Recipes | India Canteen

In the 16th century, Mughlai recipes originated in the royal kitchens of the Mughal Emperor Babur. Authentic Mughlai recipes were rich and cooked with aromatic spices, nuts, and dry fruits during that time in Indian history. The flavors of Mughlai can range from mild to spicy and are associated with their distinct aroma and use of whole, dried and ground spices.

Evolution & Distinct Features:

The autobiography of Babur named ‘Babarnama’ mention about various Mughlai recipe items including Kebab prepared out of sheep. Authentic Mughlai recipes have an extreme influence on the culinary styles and regional cuisines of present-day India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan and its cooking style are applied in traditional Indian Cuisine, particularly in Delhi and Uttar Pradesh as also in the South Indian city of Hyderabad. The cuisine also marks its influence in Karachi (Pakistan), especially among Muhajir who migrated from different regions of India during the Partition of India and Pakistan. The Mughal cooking techniques also had a deep influence in the Awadh region which eventually led to the development of the Awadhi cuisine of Lucknow (Uttar Pradesh).

The Mughals were Muslims by religion and thus did not eat pork and as Hindus did not consume beef thus meat of these two was not a part of Mughlai cuisine. The primary non-vegetarian dishes would comprise of meat of goat, sheep, and venison. The most special feature of Mughlai cuisine is the unique use of ground and whole spices and the remarkable aroma that gives each dish a different and exotic taste. Extensive use of dairy products like milk, cream, and butter in various gravies and curries makes the traditional Mughlai cuisines quite rich and heavy and also make the dishes mouth-watering with foodies ending up licking their fingers.

Making of Indian Mughlai Food

The making of Mughlai food is likely time-consuming and involves a number of flavored sauces and butter based curries. Nowadays most Indian restaurants convert Mughlai dishes as mild to medium-hot cream and nut-based gravies, rice dishes with lots of nuts, dried fruits, and rich creamy desserts where you should expect spices like cinnamon, cardamom, cloves, and nutmeg. These famous Mughlai gravies pair well with rice and bread.

The Mughlai dishes vary with both vegetarian and non-vegetarian, common dishes that feature traditional Mughlai flavors include biryani, kebabs, kofta (meatballs), pulao (or pilaf), and different tandoori items. Examples of these traditional dishes include Mughlai chicken, Mughlai biryani, Mughlai paratha, malai kofta, reshmi kebab, kadhai gosht, and murg tandoor. A wide range of traditional Mughlai sweet dishes like bread pudding shahi tukra, barfi, kalakand, and falooda.

Let us have a quick look at some of the most famous recipes:-

Popular Mughlai Dishes:

Biryani:

Biryani is a mixed rice made with aromatic spices and seasonings among other ingredients and prepared with great accuracy giving it a yummy and exotic taste. There are two major categories of Biryani like vegetarian and non-vegetarian that vary in ingredients used according to different regions they belong to or according to the meat used. Hyderabadi Biryani is the most famous variety of Biryani, also a signature dish of the Hyderabadi Muslims. The vegetarian biryani is also called Tehari. It was developed so that the Hindu who works for the Muslim Sultans can taste this rice delicacy.

Haleem:


Haleem also known as Khichra is a very famous casserole prepared with wheat, barley, lentils, rich spices, rice, and meat. This dish is cooked very slowly that takes up to seven to eight hours and ensures a fine blend of all the ingredients to give it a perfect paste-like consistency. This dish is a street food and occupies a special place across the globe during the months of Ramadan and Muharram.

Mughlai Paratha:

Mughlai Paratha is prepared with whole-wheat flour stuffed with a mix of ingredients including keema or minced meat, eggs, chopped onions, green chili and pepper among others. This bread delicacy remained among many Mughlai cuisines that made their way to the undivided Bengal and today counts among the most popular heavy snacks items of Kolkata, India as well as in Bangladesh.

Murg Musallam:


Murg Musallam is one of the most exquisite Mughlai dishes that according to sources was a favorite dish of the Sultan Muhammad bin Tughluq of Delhi at that time and also remained popular among the royal Awadhi Mughal families. The dish comprises of a whole chicken prepared with different spices and seasonings with the main ingredients like egg, tomato, ginger, and onion.

Navratan Korma:


Navratan Korma is a vegetarian delicacy from the Mughal kitchen, a vegetarian korma that is prepared out of vegetables, nuts, and paneer. Navratan means nine gems and this dish is usually prepared out of nine different vegetables.

Kebabs:

The origin of the variety of Indian Kebabs that are usually eaten as snacks or starters trace back to the Mughalai cuisine that includes appetizing dishes like Boti Kabab and Reshmi Kebab. Traditionally each of these dishes based on grilled meat has a distinct set of ingredients including an exclusive combination of spices and unique cooking procedures. With time, cooking procedures including grilling and roasting developed in preparing varied forms of kebabs, some of the popular ones being shish kebab, shammi kebab, doner kebab, Tunde ke kebab, and tikka kebab.

Rogan Josh:


Rogan Josh is originally a Persian lamb dish that was brought to Kashmir, India by the Mughals and has now become one of the staples of Kashmiri cuisine. Traditionally it is a gravy dish comprising of braised lamb chunks prepared with browned onions, ginger, garlic, and yogurt and seasoned with spices like clove, cinnamon, cardamom and bay leaves.

Pasanda:

Another delicacy from the royal Mughal kitchen is Pasanda, the name of which is probably derived from the Urdu word ‘pasande’ which means favorite. It is traditionally a rich lamb curry made of lamb legs that are flattened into strips and marinated with ingredients like chili powder, yogurt and a combination of spices for hours. The marinated lamb legs are then fried with other ingredients like onions, coriander, and chilies among others.

Sweet Dishes/Desserts:

Kulfi:


Kulfi is a popular frozen dairy-based dessert that probably originated in the 16th century during the Mughal Empire. The term Kulfi is derived from a Persian word which means a covered cup. It is a mixture of thickened milk seasoned with saffron and pistachios that is frozen in a metal cone and later served with falooda, a kind of noodles prepared from starch, and garnished with pistachio nuts, saffron and ground cardamom.

Sheer Khurma/Korma:


It is a very popular Muslim vermicelli pudding that is prepared during festivals like Eid ul-Fitr and Eid al-Adha. The main ingredients of this dish, the name of which literally means milk with dates, are whole milk, vermicelli, dates, and sugar, while rose water, almonds, raisins, pistachios, saffron, cloves, and cardamom are added depending on the choice of the region.

Firni:

Firni is a kind of rice pudding that is set and served in a shallow earthen dish. This rice-based sweet is garnished with saffron, pistachios and chopped almonds.

Shahi Tukra:

Shahi Tukra is a rice bread pudding that is especially prepared during Muslim festivals like Eid and on the month of Ramadan. The ingredient of this delicious dessert includes bread, dry fruits, and condensed milk and is seasoned with cardamom.

Top 10 Easy Diwali Special Sweets Recipes | India Canteen

Diwali or Deepavali is the special and one of the biggest festival which is celebrated all around India. It symbolises the spiritual victory of light over darkness and good over evil. In India, no celebration is complete without sweet recipes. Diwali is a time of exchanging sweets and gifts. During this festive celebration, all the temples, homes and shops are brightly decorated.

Special sweets are the highlight of every Indian festival. A great variety of sweet recipes are prepared during Diwali. It adds much more enthusiasm to the festive spirit. In this Diwali, light up your kitchen with our festive sweets recipes. Some of these can be prepared in advance and others almost needs no worry, so it can be made 1-2 days earlier.

Your guests will surely give compliments for these ultimate delicious sweets. You just need to spend very less little time in the kitchen to see the bright smiles on everyone’s faces. We bring to you our easy Diwali recipes from across the country:-

  1. Rasgullas:

    Rasgullas are a very special sweet for every occasion. They are round shaped sweet made of chhena, an Indian cottage cheese dough. These milk based desserts are cooked in sugar. Rasgullas originated in Orissa.

  2. Gajar Ka Halwa:

    This mouthwatering dish is prepared in almost all the homes of India. Gajar Ka Halwa is a sweet prepared from carrot and milk. The carrots are grated and then cooked in Milk. Celebrate Diwali with Gajar ka halwa to make the festival a more memorable affair.

  3. Puran Poli:

    Puran Poli, which is also known as Obbattu is a very famous dish that is prepared in Karnataka. It is also very popular in Maharashtra. Obbattu is a sweet and flat bread with stuffing of sweet and coconut. It comes in many varieties including peanut, coconut, sugar, Tur Dal, Sesame seed etc. A pinch of turmeric is added to it to make it look yellowish.

  1. Anjeer Barfi:

    Anjeer Cutlet is a delicious Cashew sweet. It is long cylindrical in shape. Although most people buy it from shops, but it can be prepared at home.

  1. Adhirasam:

    This dish is prepared in Tamil Nadu and it is a traditional sweet of South India. It is made of rice flour, butter, jaggery & cardamom powder which is sprinkled on the top. It is a famous sweet, especially for the occasion of Diwali. The most important part of making the adhirasam sweet is its syrup(paagu). The syrup makes it really tasty.

  1. Mysore Pak:

    Another famous sweet from Karnataka which is very delicious. Its original name was Mysore Pak as it was made from the flour of Masoor Dhal. It was initially prepared for a royal family of Mysore Palace. After that it was renamed Mysore Pak. The dish contains a good amount of Butter, Ghee, Gram flour and Sugar. The sweet is very soft and spongy and it melts in the mouth.

  1. Kaju Katli:

    Cashew Barfi or Kaju Katli is a special Diwali sweet. Kaju barfi is made of sugar and cashew nut powder. It is in the shape of flat diamond. As compared to other sweets, Kaju Barfi is expensive. So, why not make it at home?

  1. Gujia:

    Gujia is a very famous sweet of North India, Rajasthan. It’s a traditional sweet of Diwali made from Maida flour and is stuffed with khoya. It is a special dish, traditionally prepared for Diwali. It is known by different names according to states (for eg. Karanji, Karachika, Ghugra, Kajjikayi etc). In different states, the filling of this dish varies. Like in Uttar Pradesh, the filling is done with sweetened khoya and nuts while in Goa, filling is done with shredded coconut, jaggery and nuts.

  1. Laddus:

    Laddus are small sweet ball Indian sweets basically made with flour, nuts, sugar, jaggery, ghee or depends on its different varieties. A Diwali is incomplete without laddus. They are also available in many varieties like Til Ladoo, Coconut Laddu etc.

  1. Gulab Jamun:

    This list will be incomplete without the special mention of Gulab Jamun. It is made of Khoya, Wheat flour, chenna(pressed milk curd), cardamom and rose water. It is prepared using pure ghee. The name of the sweet Gulab Jamun is derived from Persian word gulab meaning ‘rose water’. The word jamun refers to a fruit of South Asia which is similar in shape and size to that of Gulab Jamun.

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