Pulses: Important Part Of Healthy Meal

year_of_pulses

Photo Courtesy: Food Tank

Pulses have important place in an Indian meal, either in South India or in North India; in states from Western India or in East Indian states. These are included in main meals as yummy dishes like Dal Makhani or just Plain Dal with Tadka, Sambhar or Chole etc.

Chole

Chole

Pulses are an important ingredient of some special preparations like Puran Poli, Dahi Vada and many others. Pulses are cooked as whole, split, husked or washed. They can be used in a variety of ways in soups, curries, salads, snacks and desserts. Soaking of pulses is advisable before cooking to reduce cooking time.

Dahi Vada

Dahi Vada

For those who are vegetarian, Pulses are vital as an important source of proteins. These are good source of thiamine, riboflavin and niacin (all vitamin B). Also supply carbohydrates, calcium, carotene, iron and potassium. Whole pulses and split dal with skin provide good quantity of fiber. Skin also prevents loss of water soluble nutrients. Nutritive value and digestibility of pulses can be increased by sprouting or fermenting them. There is an appreciable increase of the B vitamins, iron and also vitamin C after sprouting of pulses. Fermentation also increases the content of the vitamin B like in Idli, Dosa and Dhokla.

Dosa

Dosa

As pulses are good source of protein and low in carbohydrate, hence are good options to substitute part of total cereals, to provide balanced calories to a patient of Diabetes or for those who need to control intake of calories. But total protein content has to be kept in mind, not to overload kidneys. Some pulses constitute soluble fiber like Rajma. Soluble fiber helps to control cholesterol in blood. These are useful for conditions like- high cholesterol, hypertension and high blood pressure.

We will now discuss about preparation of Rajma Curry.

 

Rajmah Curry

Rajma Curry

Rajma Curry

 

Serves -1                      Portion size – 1bowl

Ingredients

Rajmah – 40 g dry or 80 g soaked

Water – 1:4 by volume

Salt -1/2 t

Hing(Asafoetida) -1 pinch

Red chili powder – 1/8 t

Garam masala (Ground Spices) powder -1/8 t

Garlic – 2 cloves

Onion – 40 g

Oil – 1T

Turmeric powder – 1/8 t

Coriander powder -1/4 t

Tomato -50 g

Curd – 1 t

Coriander leaves – 1 sprig

Method-

Pick and wash rajmah, soak overnight. Drain and make 2 c of water, if required, by adding additional water. Pressure cook with water, salt and hing for 20 minutes on low heat after first whistle. Let it cool and drain the rajmah, reserve the stock. Make a paste of onion, ginger and garlic, fry it in heated oil until golden brown. Add chili powder, coriander powder and turmeric powder, fry for two minutes. Add garam masala pd and paste of tomatoes. Fry until it leaves sides of the pan, add beaten curd. Fry again till the curd is absorbed in masala. Add the drained rajmah and fry for another five minutes. Add reserved stock and cook for five minutes after it starts boiling. Serve hot garnished with chopped coriander leaves either with rice or chapati.

Nutritive Value:

Calories -268,

Protein – 10.5 g

Fat -11 g

Carbohydrate – 31.8 g

Fiber – 3.7 g

Calcium -162 mg

Iron – 2.6 mg

Carotene – 193 micro g

Vitamins B

Sodium and Potassium.

6 Grandma’s Remedies For Common Problems

Image Courtesy: indiatimes

Image Courtesy: indiatimes

No one will contest the saying that “health is wealth”. But as we human beings are running after wealth, our health is getting neglected. With time man discovers more and more drugs and cures, diseases too seem to be keeping pace and increasing or becoming more rampant.

Allopathic drugs may give fast relief but they have a lot of side effects and are expensive. Ayurvedic and homeopathic systems of treatment claim to attack the root cause but these medicines test the patience of the patient and take much longer to cure. Appropriate diet along with correct medicinal course is the most ideal way to prevent control/treat a disease. Not only can this but a suitable diet even cure a disease. Treating food deficiency diseases successfully by supplementing right proportions of nutrients in diet is well known. It is not breaking news that diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, gout and many other diseases can be managed with proper diet, if given due attention at the right stage. No one can forget grandma’s simple remedies for troubles like cough, sore throat, loose motions, constipation, flatulence, nausea and the list is endless. This system of treatment is valuable for everyone who believes in good nutrition for a healthy mind and body. The basis for treatment through diet is scientific knowledge of food ingredients and diseases, their course of action in human gut after ingestion and art of cooking.

Time tested Grandma’s remedies for some common problems:

  • Cough –

Warm milk – 1 glass, turmeric pd – ¼ t, sugar candy (misri) – 1 t, black pepper (freshly pounded)

Mix all ingredients and drink just before going to bed at night for 3-4 days.

  • Loose motions –
  1. watery buttermilk – 1 glass, methi seeds ½ t

Swallow down methi seeds with buttermilk 4-5 times in a day

  1. black pepper pd – ¼ t, pure ghee – 1/2t, hot rice – 1T

Make a small ball of all three ingredients and eat in one gulp before a meal.

  • Sore throat –
  1. Drink tea boiled with ginger and tulsi leaves 2-3 times a day.
  2. Make a fine paste of Mulahthi. Apply it as paint around throat 2-3 times a day.
  3. Chew a plain paan with Mulahthi 2-3 times a day.
  • Constipation –

Hot milk – 1 glass, pure ghee-1/2 t.

Mix and drink as the last thing before sleeping.

  • Sciatica –

Warm water – ½ glass, lemon juice of ½ lemon, honey 1 t.

Mix all three ingredients and take on empty stomach every morning.

  • Mouth blisters –

Chew a few pieces of dry coconut, allow the juice to cover blisters and spit. Repeat every 2 hours.

 

For interesting recipes from around the world, please visit: http://tastyfix.com/

Ghevar: A Delight of Indian Cuisine

Photo Courtesy: idiva

Photo Courtesy: idiva

A Rajasthani sweet, Ghevar is traditionally linked with Teej Festival which comes during the monsoon season. Teej represents the union of Goddess Parvati & Lord Shiva. Besides Rajasthan, the dessert is very famous in nearby states of Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat, Harayana, Delhi, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh etc.

Ghevar is normally made in January for Makar Sankranti festival, in March-April for Gangaur festival and in July-August for the festival of Teej.

This dessert has its origins in the city of Jaipur, capital of Rajasthan. Flour, sugar and oil are mixed with ghee forming thick and tempting batter. The batter is fried into a cake and then cooled, served with almonds, pistachios or cardamom powder.

The Indian cooks use good amount of sugar, oil, flour, milk and ghee to make Ghevar during Teej. Ghevar easily available throughout India in the days close to Teej. This dessert is first fried in a pot, then it is taken out and left to cool. The cakes of Ghevar are put in levels with three different layers cooled, sugar dipped and put on top of each other to give you a delicious dish.

There are many types of Ghevar that include Plain Ghevar, Mewa Ghevar & Malai Ghevar. When a layered Ghevar is made, sometime people add custard cream at the top of each layer. Many people use cardamom powder, pistachios and almonds on the top of these layers when they are wet with sugar. Another recipe for this sweet is made by making a hole in the center and filling the hole with cream or figs.

If you want to know more about Indian sweets, you can go to: South Asian Sweets

Try some Ghevar recipes at home:-

  1. Recipe 1 : http://bit.ly/1LwtiA7
  2. Recipe 2 : http://bit.ly/1EfWYPP
  3. Ghevar With Rabri Recipe : http://bit.ly/1PvsxoR
  4. Ghevar With Kesar Rabri Recipe: http://bit.ly/1hXh8Uy
  5. Video: http://bit.ly/1Nxe3Y2

Eat Curry and Banish Bad Memories

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A recent study suggests that a spice used commonly in curry can help in erasing bad memories. A bright-yellow compound found in turmeric, which is also present in Curcumin prevents storage of new fear memories in the brain. The compound also removed fear memories that were already stored.

A research was conducted in The City University, New York by Psychologists. They found that the rats became scared after hearing a particular sound. The rats froze after hearing a particular sound as they were frightened.

After a few hours, when the same sound was played again to the rats. Those that were given ordinary food froze. But those who were given a curcumin rich diet did not freeze. Thus, it was concluded that fearful memories were erased.

Read more: http://time.com/3649565/curcumin-ptsd/

So, if you are a foodie and visiting India, try the Indian Curry. Maybe, you will not need to visit the psychologist again.

Want to try the Indian Curry? Try this recipe by Sanjeev Kapoor: http://www.tastyfix.com/video/indian-curry-recipe